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Sincere Change: Looking in the Mirror

A reader from Indiana recently wrote,

“Dear Joe,  I know I could be a better mother and a better friend if I could improve the way I communicate. My problem is I don’t want to change into somebody I’m not. How can I stay sincere to myself and change at the same time.” — Susan V.

This is a very good question and one that most people aren’t willing to acknowledge. It is one of the biggest challenges that keeps most individuals and organizations from making true transformation. While they may sincerely desire to make fundamental changes, they have a greater psychological desire not to change anything by which they define themselves.

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Igniting a Transformation: About Congruency Training

I am often engaged by leaders of organizations seeking to ignite a transformation. In my leadership and organizational development programs around the country and the world, I have encountered questions about transformational thinking and how to move hearts and minds.

In this blog, my team takes a Q and A approach to addressing training formats and the best way to achieve transformation to reach better outcomes in a leadership team and an entire organization.

Q: Explain your approach to transformational thinking.

Joe Caruso: The templates on which our thoughts are formed typically live in the past: past myths, old driving truths, and past self-definitions. Transformational thinking is different from the way an individual or organization normally thinks in that it doesn’t rely on these three things. When we don’t use past myths, old driving-truths and past self-definitions, we are more likely to think differently enough or change our approach enough to create a vastly different outcome. In other words, to change the behavior, we must first change the thinking that drives the behavior. This is necessary to experience transformational thinking.

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Business as “Unusual” – Transformational Thinking

In an interview with Newsweek Magazine, Jack Welch, the iconic CEO of General Electric said, “The old days of asking managers for 3 percent productivity gains–you can’t settle for that. You can’t think incrementally–you have to think transformationally.”

While he’s right, this is much easier to say than to do. The challenge is that few people, let alone organizations, understand the mechanics of transformation. Most people have never had a transformation, and surely even less actually know the mechanics of how to “create” one. One of my pet peeves is when I hear someone say they’re going to attend a full day or multi-day seminar on “change” with the goal of “getting one good thing out of it.” Have we become so jaded about our ability to truly transition that we’ll settle for merely learning “one” new concept as significant movement in our quest? This is hardly the stuff of transformation.

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Make Objectives Understandable (Gideons)

Vision statements, mission statements and strategic objectives are often misused and abused because they’re too often misunderstood.

Too many organizations understand that it’s important to have these things, yet don’t seem to understand just how powerful they can be.

Each year, I spend more than 170 days traveling, flying to various cities and staying in different hotels. While the comfort and decor of each room varied, there was one thing I knew would be consistent.  If I looked inside the drawer of the bed stand, I’d find a Bible. I could be sure I’d find that Bible because of the strength of a vision and the conviction of a mission.

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Leading in An Out of Control World – CASE Council of Administrators of Special Education

As a keynote speaker during the 19th annual 2008 CASE Conference, Joe was asked to contribute a feature article for the newsletter for the Council of Administrators of Special Education, CASE, a division of the Council for Exceptional Children, published bi-monthly.

Leading in an Out of Control World

A lot is asked of the CASE professional. It’s difficult enough to try to properly function in the dysfunctional and out of control environment that special education professionals deal with every day. Now CASE is asking you to lead as well?!

How does one lead a process that they don’t control? Further, how can one lead disparate individuals in micro-communities with varying and various agendas? Not to mention that there is no “leadership” line item on your already stretched too thin budget.

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